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Archive for October 8th, 2008

With all the bad news, and news given to people who have done nothing more than be pathetic examples of humanity, it’s about time to show that there are inspirational people and things out there.

update:

1)  added some negative crap that couldn’t be ignored (bottom)

2)  plugged in some Obama-toons that were sent to me (below that)

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THIS is the definition of a hero, and many thanks to MailOnSunday.UK for reporting on this.  Go there and find the rest of the article.

Think about it:

A man who creeps into enemy territory, and for FOUR DAYS avoids mortar fire to do hand-drawn sketches of enemy fortifications, troops, and camp layouts – he is a hero.

Astonishingly, Private Smith’s courageous role with the 7th London Battalion has remained a secret to all but his closest family for almost 90 years. He was never decorated and died in 1974 aged 83.

Man are we soft.  He had to be scared.  He had to be in fear of getting caught all the time.  He did it time and time again.

A Tree He Drew - That Was Pivotal

The article goes on:

The Pictures and Diary of a Wartime Artist was compiled by the soldier’s great-nephew Dave Mason. It includes sketches, observation notes and extracts from Private Smith’s wartime diary.

Mr Mason, 62, of Woodford Green, Essex, said yesterday: ‘I was amazed when I read the diary to find out how much he had been involved in the Great War.

‘He talks of his friends and how most of them were killed, of the narrow escapes he had, but at the same time he is very conservative about the German soldiers he killed.

‘Len, like most of his generation, was a humble man who did not boast or revel in what he had been through during the war. He always said, ‘I would rather have a WC than a VC’.’

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Perseverence and hard work pay off, as the SpaceX team has shown.  Proving that space is not necessarily blocked to commercial ventures tethered to NASA.  Below is the release put out by the head at SpaceX, ELON MUSK (CEO AND CTO):

A week spent reviewing data has confirmed that the flight went really well, including the coast and restart. The mood here at SpaceX is just ecstatic! This is the culmination of six years of hard work by a very talented team. It is also a great relief for me, who led the overall design of the rocket (not a role I expected to have when starting the company). I felt a little sheepish receiving the AIAA award for the most outstanding contribution to the field of space transportation two weeks before this flight.

Orbit was achieved with the first burn terminating at 330.5 km altitude and 8.99 degree inclination. The goal for initial insertion was a 330 km altitude and a 9.0 degree inclination, so this was right on target! Accuracy far exceeded our expectations, particularly given that this was the first time Falcon 1 reached orbit.

The primary purpose of the second burn was to test the restart capability and then burn as long as possible. The upper stage coasted for 43.5 minutes and then burned for 6.8 seconds, which is 4 seconds longer than needed to circularize. Most of the burn was actually done sideways to avoid creating a highly elliptical orbit, hence a change in inclination to 9.3 degrees. The final orbit, confirmed by US Space Command, was 621 km by 643 km.

Liftoff of Falcon 1, Flight 4 from the Kwajalein Atoll on September 28, 2008 (UTC).

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Elsewhere, on a project more personal to me… MESSENGER passed Mercury on it’s second flyby, and returned this as one of the first images for this stage.  Click the images for the BIG BIG BIG versions. Captions and information comes directly from Johns Hopkins Laboratory APL news updates.

Picture taken by the Wide Angle Camera (WAC), part of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) instrument, about 90 minutes after MESSENGER's closest approach to Mercury, when the spacecraft was at a distance of about 27,000 kilometers (about 17,000 miles).

This WAC image is one of 11 viewed through different narrow-band color filters, the set of which will enable detailed color studies of this newly imaged area. In addition, the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) acquired a high-resolution mosaic of most of this thin crescent view of Mercury at a resolution better than 0.5 kilometers/pixel (0.3 miles/pixel) that will enable the MESSENGER team to explore this newly imaged region of Mercury’s surface in more detail. Images acquired during the flyby are currently still being transmitted to Earth, and the MESSENGER team is busy examining each of the 1223 as it arrives

This WAC image is one of 11 viewed through different narrow-band color filters, the set of which will enable detailed color studies of this newly imaged area. In addition, the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) acquired a high-resolution mosaic of most of this thin crescent view of Mercury at a resolution better than 0.5 kilometers/pixel (0.3 miles/pixel) that will enable the MESSENGER team to explore this newly imaged region of Mercury’s surface in more detail. Images acquired during the flyby are currently still being transmitted to Earth, and the MESSENGER team is busy examining each of the 1223 as it arrives

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I have to post this… I have to.  As an example of the worst examples of human beings.

After AIG was bailed out, they sent the executives to a resort because, the poor dears, they were stressed out and uncomfortable.

Goddamnit, isn’t anybody going to pounce on these jackasses and kick the living shit out of them? (click it for larger version)  We’re talking about nearly half a million dollars for these shits.


Smoking Gun’s full report on it.

Poor dears… instead of using this for their bathroom breaks:

They’ll have to use this instead:

If the worst should happen they’ll resort to tens or (gasp) even fives.  Bastards.

Note:  I have no idea who to attribute those pics to – they were on a BB and unattributed – if you own ’em, claim ’em, please.

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O’Bama razzing – careful lest we break his paper-thin skin.

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