Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘expo’

Well that was a lot of fun today.

First off, I totally Yorl’ed out and got a leather duster – it was a Christmas present but I never ordered it, instead opting to buy after trying it on again.  Glad I did.  I needed an extra inch in the shoulders plus some room to put on flannel or other shirt to stay warm in Michigan winters.  The duster comes to just above my ankles and that is exactly what I hoped for – something to keep the winter wind away from my body – it can be awful windchill suckiness at times.

Would you believe Cruel Wife pretty much insisted that I get it?

Later… Good news.  I was able to contact the artisan directly and correct a misunderstanding on my part – damn my bad hearing (you won’t find me saying that often).   I was trying to talk to two sales reps and hear what they were saying, listen to Cruel Wife, stare at passers-by, and read lips – all over the noise of the crowd.  I had thought that the mantle was removable but found I was mistaken.  So after a quick couple of e:mails the lady who makes this stuff said she’d make it removable at no extra cost.  Awesome.

Here is what it will mostly look like except mine will have the removable mantle.


Here is Phil Foglio and his staff.  Opted to protect his identity but he’s easily recognizable from his self-portraited cartoon in the Girl Genius series.  Funny fella to listen to giving a talk.   Here he was taking a serious break.

Below, she’s all wound up.  Very well done outfit with the subtle yet superb wind-up key in the back.  I thought it was best of show, honestly.  No idea who this is. 

We went to a “Steampunking your Home” thing (or something to that effect).  The guy from ModVic and SteamPuffin (http://www.facebook.com/ModVic) gave a talk about finding the raw materials and inspiration for Steampunk creation.  Absolutely fascinating talk – an hour flew by and it was easily the best part of the whole day.

This lamp was my favorite piece in the whole place besides a projector that had been repurposed – it was the old lamp/wick style projector.   Why no pic?  Because it wouldn’t have done it justice, that’s why.  I didn’t even bother.

Somebody really cares a great deal for a friend or family member.  Look at all the work that must’ve gone into making this wheelchair.  I really apologize for the nasty orange wood color and the overexposure – but I don’t want to spend the effort to fix it because that post right behind it is going to make it look nasty unless I spend time addressing it directly.  Ugh.  I expected better from the Hyatt, but oh well.

****

Scroll down to the “Gelatin filled Christmas Ornament (on keyboard)… wicked awesomeness.

http://www.boingboing.net/2011/05/26/moment.html

****

Ha!  I KNEW IT!!!  Thank you, Fark, for shedding light on the matter.

Secret to a happy marriage?  Delusion.

Take sentences out of the article out of context is absolutely frightening…

Those who inflated their partner’s assets also reported being more happily married.

Is that anything like “Pumping his junk”?

If the couple is happily married, it could be that the better half of the couple has an idealistic vision of the lesser half.

Which might explain why Cruel Wife puts up with my bullsh*t.

I’ve always said she was delusional.

Read Full Post »

From The Dude:

An archeological team, digging in Washington DC, has uncovered 10,000 year old bones and fossil remains of what is believed to be the first Politician.

Nice catch, Dude!

****

Somebody, and I don’t want to name names but it was Laconic Pup, thought the two titles were equivalent.

Here’s the original advert.

Here is the interpretation or rather, what the average soldier or engineer sees…

****

But since when has anyone listened to the CBO?  I’ve posted it here in case the CBO’s site “goes down unexpectedly”.  Emphasis in bold and red is mine.

Federal Debt and the Risk of a Fiscal Crisis

July 27, 2010

Economic and Budget Issue Brief

Summary

Over the past few years, U.S. government debt held by the public has grown rapidly—to the point that, compared with the total output of the economy, it is now higher than it has ever been except during the period around World War II. The recent increase in debt has been the result of three sets of factors: an imbalance between federal revenues and spending that predates the recession and the recent turmoil in financial markets, sharply lower revenues and elevated spending that derive directly from those economic conditions, and the costs of various federal policies implemented in response to the conditions.

Further increases in federal debt relative to the nation’s output (gross domestic product, or GDP) almost certainly lie ahead if current policies remain in place. The aging of the population and rising costs for health care will push federal spending, measured as a percentage of GDP, well above the levels experienced in recent decades. Unless policymakers restrain the growth of spending, increase revenues significantly as a share of GDP, or adopt some combination of those two approaches, growing budget deficits will cause debt to rise to unsupportable levels.

Although deficits during or shortly after a recession generally hasten economic recovery, persistent deficits and continually mounting debt would have several negative economic consequences for the United States. Some of those consequences would arise gradually: A growing portion of people’s savings would go to purchase government debt rather than toward investments in productive capital goods such as factories and computers; that “crowding out” of investment would lead to lower output and incomes than would otherwise occur. In addition, if the payment of interest on the extra debt was financed by imposing higher marginal tax rates, those rates would discourage work and saving and further reduce output. Rising interest costs might also force reductions in spending on important government programs. Moreover, rising debt would increasingly restrict the ability of policymakers to use fiscal policy to respond to unexpected challenges, such as economic downturns or international crises.

Beyond those gradual consequences, a growing level of federal debt would also increase the probability of a sudden fiscal crisis, during which investors would lose confidence in the government’s ability to manage its budget, and the government would thereby lose its ability to borrow at affordable rates. It is possible that interest rates would rise gradually as investors’ confidence declined, giving legislators advance warning of the worsening situation and sufficient time to make policy choices that could avert a crisis. But as other countries’ experiences show, it is also possible that investors would lose confidence abruptly and interest rates on government debt would rise sharply. The exact point at which such a crisis might occur for the United States is unknown, in part because the ratio of federal debt to GDP is climbing into unfamiliar territory and in part because the risk of a crisis is influenced by a number of other factors, including the government’s long-term budget outlook, its near-term borrowing needs, and the health of the economy. When fiscal crises do occur, they often happen during an economic downturn, which amplifies the difficulties of adjusting fiscal policy in response.

If the United States encountered a fiscal crisis, the abrupt rise in interest rates would reflect investors’ fears that the government would renege on the terms of its existing debt or that it would increase the supply of money to finance its activities or pay creditors and thereby boost inflation. To restore investors’ confidence, policymakers would probably need to enact spending cuts or tax increases more drastic and painful than those that would have been necessary had the adjustments come sooner.

Entire document here (link).

07-27_Debt_FiscalCrisis_Brief (download it from this blog).

#  FogSensor Realistic Camera .dat file.close
#  Date: 072710
#  Time: 11:10pm-ish
#  Based on the VISHAY BPV10NF Silicon PIN Photodiode
#  G. Ritter & J. Trenkle – Michigan Aerospace Corporation
#
# Matrix describes a 2.5mm radius dome with an aperture defined at 5mm dia
# sensor element is 0.78mm^2 or .883mm on a side (square).  The sensor
# occurs 4.4mm after the 1st surface vertex, so 1.9mm after the aperture stop.
# n(pin) was calculated using the 20 degree half angle (70 degree incidence)
# arriving at the aperture stop and refracting to opposite sensor element edge
# = sin(radians(70))/sin(radians(32.86)) = 1.732
# 0.000 0.000 1.732 0.005
# #########################################################
# radius    sep     n   aperture
0.0025 0.0025 1.732 0.005
0.000 0.000 0.000 0.005

Read Full Post »