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Posts Tagged ‘shit’

Cat-crap Busy.

Been kind of busy lately when not cluster-migraining it all over the landscape. Two days shot to hell and a near-miss to the hospital because it sucked worse than dying for a little bit, a day or two post-migraine celebratory hangover for the fun of it, and a few days playing catch-up.

Hadn’t heard from a scientist friend in a while so I suggested we catch up if she’s not too busy, if it was indeed a busy time for her. Her response was poetry.

Busy? As busy as a cat burying a turd on a marble floor, as a friend of mine puts it…

That brings a tear to my eye.

Ok, now a visual brought to me by Black Lab on Amphetamines.

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More. From somewhere else. The best key hanger that I have liked the looks of in the last 24 hours.

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From some pet-shaming link that I couldn’t recall the name of.

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YOU wouldn’t trust that thing, would you? That is our Mrs. Reynolds.

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And just because I am feeling lazy… Sharks with frickin’ lasers on their heads.

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By the way, has anyone seen that lurker veeshir lurking about? It isn’t like him to not cross over the boycott lines once or twice a day.

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Yay me.

Update #2:

Holy f***.   11:39pm… gonna be a long night.

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Update:

Ok, so for a brief while there I was feeling pretty ok, able to move my head all around.  By the time we got to the car I was feeling kind of cruddy.  Still am.

The deal, talking with the doc before the procedure is that I have three bulging discs in my neck, one moderately severe based on what I told him about leaning forward to hold something in the lab and having my finger and thumb go numb.

So what they did was the epidural and combined it with several cortisone injections for arthritis, the logic being that do them all at once and you have less trips into the operating room.

As bad as all that news is, at least I don’t have to wonder if someone thinks it is all in my head.

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Today is another exciting edition of Cervical Epidural Day!

I can’t wait.  Another hour and 12 minutes by my reckoning.  A wee bit more risk than the previous spots and if history is any guide as soon as the anesthetic wears off 12 hours after that I’m going to be a hurtin’ puppy.  Don’t know why I don’t handle ’em well but I just don’t.  But if it works, it’s good news and bad news.

Good news because I’ll get some temporary relief.  Bad news because, if I understand it right, if it works then it’s probably going to mean disc removal in the future.  Huh.  I guess I’m not all that opposed to it if it helps but I sure don’t want a nasty painful procedure that doesn’t change the Quality-of-Life meter.

More later.

And yes, I’m telling them I want a sedative.

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And truly, this is NSFW, brought to you by Lady Clankington.  Steampunk and “personal stimulation”.  Yes, the article is nearly a year old.  I just thought you might be tittilated.  Or something.

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From The Dude:

An archeological team, digging in Washington DC, has uncovered 10,000 year old bones and fossil remains of what is believed to be the first Politician.

Nice catch, Dude!

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Somebody, and I don’t want to name names but it was Laconic Pup, thought the two titles were equivalent.

Here’s the original advert.

Here is the interpretation or rather, what the average soldier or engineer sees…

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But since when has anyone listened to the CBO?  I’ve posted it here in case the CBO’s site “goes down unexpectedly”.  Emphasis in bold and red is mine.

Federal Debt and the Risk of a Fiscal Crisis

July 27, 2010

Economic and Budget Issue Brief

Summary

Over the past few years, U.S. government debt held by the public has grown rapidly—to the point that, compared with the total output of the economy, it is now higher than it has ever been except during the period around World War II. The recent increase in debt has been the result of three sets of factors: an imbalance between federal revenues and spending that predates the recession and the recent turmoil in financial markets, sharply lower revenues and elevated spending that derive directly from those economic conditions, and the costs of various federal policies implemented in response to the conditions.

Further increases in federal debt relative to the nation’s output (gross domestic product, or GDP) almost certainly lie ahead if current policies remain in place. The aging of the population and rising costs for health care will push federal spending, measured as a percentage of GDP, well above the levels experienced in recent decades. Unless policymakers restrain the growth of spending, increase revenues significantly as a share of GDP, or adopt some combination of those two approaches, growing budget deficits will cause debt to rise to unsupportable levels.

Although deficits during or shortly after a recession generally hasten economic recovery, persistent deficits and continually mounting debt would have several negative economic consequences for the United States. Some of those consequences would arise gradually: A growing portion of people’s savings would go to purchase government debt rather than toward investments in productive capital goods such as factories and computers; that “crowding out” of investment would lead to lower output and incomes than would otherwise occur. In addition, if the payment of interest on the extra debt was financed by imposing higher marginal tax rates, those rates would discourage work and saving and further reduce output. Rising interest costs might also force reductions in spending on important government programs. Moreover, rising debt would increasingly restrict the ability of policymakers to use fiscal policy to respond to unexpected challenges, such as economic downturns or international crises.

Beyond those gradual consequences, a growing level of federal debt would also increase the probability of a sudden fiscal crisis, during which investors would lose confidence in the government’s ability to manage its budget, and the government would thereby lose its ability to borrow at affordable rates. It is possible that interest rates would rise gradually as investors’ confidence declined, giving legislators advance warning of the worsening situation and sufficient time to make policy choices that could avert a crisis. But as other countries’ experiences show, it is also possible that investors would lose confidence abruptly and interest rates on government debt would rise sharply. The exact point at which such a crisis might occur for the United States is unknown, in part because the ratio of federal debt to GDP is climbing into unfamiliar territory and in part because the risk of a crisis is influenced by a number of other factors, including the government’s long-term budget outlook, its near-term borrowing needs, and the health of the economy. When fiscal crises do occur, they often happen during an economic downturn, which amplifies the difficulties of adjusting fiscal policy in response.

If the United States encountered a fiscal crisis, the abrupt rise in interest rates would reflect investors’ fears that the government would renege on the terms of its existing debt or that it would increase the supply of money to finance its activities or pay creditors and thereby boost inflation. To restore investors’ confidence, policymakers would probably need to enact spending cuts or tax increases more drastic and painful than those that would have been necessary had the adjustments come sooner.

Entire document here (link).

07-27_Debt_FiscalCrisis_Brief (download it from this blog).

#  FogSensor Realistic Camera .dat file.close
#  Date: 072710
#  Time: 11:10pm-ish
#  Based on the VISHAY BPV10NF Silicon PIN Photodiode
#  G. Ritter & J. Trenkle – Michigan Aerospace Corporation
#
# Matrix describes a 2.5mm radius dome with an aperture defined at 5mm dia
# sensor element is 0.78mm^2 or .883mm on a side (square).  The sensor
# occurs 4.4mm after the 1st surface vertex, so 1.9mm after the aperture stop.
# n(pin) was calculated using the 20 degree half angle (70 degree incidence)
# arriving at the aperture stop and refracting to opposite sensor element edge
# = sin(radians(70))/sin(radians(32.86)) = 1.732
# 0.000 0.000 1.732 0.005
# #########################################################
# radius    sep     n   aperture
0.0025 0.0025 1.732 0.005
0.000 0.000 0.000 0.005

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